Cross-Platform Intersection of Measurements in Transmedia Comics

Authors

  • А. Мусин Al-Farabi Kazakh National University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.26577/JPsS.2020.v73.i2.17
        58 40

Abstract

The widespread adoption of multi-platform initiatives is transforming the modern media landscape. The comics industry, intensified by placing content on multiple platforms at once, creates its own dimen- sions and reality.

A scientific analysis of the functional features and signs of the transmedia environment of comics al- lows us to determine the main characteristics of the audience and followers of this type of mass culture, study the semiotics and graphic language of communication, identify ideological aberrations, lay the foundations for mapping the Kazakhstan transmedia landscape in terms of web comics.

Objective: to identify cross-platform intersections of comic discourse measurements as a global project of interconnected transmedia stakeholders. A complex network of cross-media and trans-media dimensions and spaces, synthesizing an artistic, dramatic and scenario product, can be considered a viral idea that has captured the minds of millions. Expanding the boundaries of thinking, moving away from reality into a world of serene dreams, is becoming a global sphere of interconnected media space in which people can shape their worldview, moral beliefs, and political preferences.

In the context of the theory of social interactionism, typologies of linguistic signs are considered, symbols and images of specific examples of graphic and multimedia comics are analyzed. The author comes to the conclusion about the totality of the influence of the media and cultural ideology of comics on different age categories of fans, the high level of coverage of the Kazakhstan consumer with the ideas of global comic marketing.

Key words: transmedia, cross-media, comics, cinema, music, theater, series.

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Published

2020-07-24

How to Cite

Мусин, А. (2020). Cross-Platform Intersection of Measurements in Transmedia Comics. The Journal of Psychology &Amp; Sociology, 73(2), 149–159. https://doi.org/10.26577/JPsS.2020.v73.i2.17